Is your age a factor behind your sexual problems?

Is your age a factor behind your sexual problems?

A well circulated Internet humour says that men go to Niagara for their first honeymoon and Viagra for their second. The bitter pinch is that it reminds you of how your sex life can change as you get older. This is same for both men and women. Female sexual dysfunction (FSD), which includes issues ranging from low libido to non-existent orgasms, affects nearly 60% women who are in their 60s, which is twice the percentage of 30+ women suffering from FSD. Your sexual desire drops with lack of testosterone production in the body; and if you are a man, arterial plaques can prevent smooth blood flow in the penis. But how many old men do actually suffer from impotence?

According to statistics, more than 77% men suffer from erectile dysfunction (ED) by the time they reach 75 years. The incidence of impotence is 39% in men ageing 40 years. About 46% men in their early 60s suffer from frequent difficulties in getting and maintaining erections for successful sexual intercourse. So if you go by the hard facts about impotence, you have to say that this problem can get only worse as you age.

If your hero is Sean Connery, you might be tempted to ask why he is still going like a stud while most men of his age become Jurassic. The secret to defeat impotence at old age often lies in how you spent your younger days. Smoking excessively and neglecting health conditions like diabetes mellitus in your heydays can be big risk factors of erectile dysfunction in old age. For women, lack of testosterone plays the spoilsport in terms of complete sexual enjoyment.

A number of clinical trials have revealed that the average age for the onset of impotence is 65 years for most men. For women though, surgical removal of ovaries can lead to a sudden drop in testosterone levels, causing FSD at any age. If you take a look at the drug information panel on the pack of anti-ED medicines such as Viagra, Cialis or Levitra, you may find precautions about their use for men aged 65 or above. The safest way to find out what you can take and what you can’t is, as always, talking to a doctor and follow up on expert advice.